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One week ago this hour I received my new camera and I have now taken over 1,000 photos
1. The following images are NOT "straight out of the camera" - I see little or no point in shooting (or presenting) raw images if I am NOT going to "work them". At the end of the day what I am concerned about is what I can squeeze out of a camera's images using the post-processing techniques (including selective noise reduction if needed) and tools available to me. For me - and I think a lot of wildlife photographers - knowing what image quality I can expect to "squeeze" out of an image at a particular ISO is more useful in guiding my future choice of ISO in the field than showing simple untouched images would be. Your own results with D500 images may be better or worse than mine depending on the image-editing software you use, your post-processing skills, and the time and effort you want to put into your images. If you are a JPEG shooter it is unlikely that you would be able to attain the same results (sorry, but a fact is a fact!).

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1. The following images are NOT "straight out of the camera" - I see little or no point in shooting (or presenting) raw images if I am NOT going to "work them". At the end of the day what I am concerned about is what I can squeeze out of a camera's images using the post-processing techniques (including selective noise reduction if needed) and tools available to me. For me - and I think a lot of wildlife photographers - knowing what image quality I can expect to "squeeze" out of an image at a particular ISO is more useful in guiding my future choice of ISO in the field than showing simple untouched images would be. Your own results with D5 images may be better or worse than mine depending on the image-editing software you use, your post-processing skills, and the time and effort you want to put into your images. If you are a JPEG shooter it is unlikely that you would be able to attain the same results (sorry, but a fact is a fact!).

 

Hirens BootCD 10.0 | Davidusman's Weblog


Finally - a bit of credit where credit is due. It's always easy to criticize a company like Nikon or Canon or Adobe for the things they appear to bungle up or do in a way that doesn't seem to perfect to us. And it's equally easy to overlook all the things they do well and never publicly acknowledge them for doing a lot of things right. I feel compelled to extend some kudos to Nikon over the way they have handled the D5 and D500 product rollouts. Not only are the cameras getting into user's hands when they are supposed to (even up here in Canada!), but we're seeing the accompanying downloadable product manuals being delivered precisely on time and even "earlier than ever before" 3rd party raw support from their partners like Adobe and Phase One (which does NOT happen without Nikon working closely with their business partners). Heck, even the improved product complementarity (of the D5 and D500) is a big improvement over similar "sibling" introductions of the past. Someone at Nikon is doing their job right. Well done - and thanks!


1. I am a STILL photographer, not a videographer. In fact, I am an admitted video imbecile and have no immediate plans to change that. As such, I am unqualified to comment on ANY aspect of the video performance of the D5 or any other camera. My comments on the D5 will be limited to features relevant to still photography.


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As an editorial note, I've been using Nikon's "economy version" of the 70-200mm (i.e., the AF-S NIKKOR 70-200mm f4G ED VR) for a few years now and I have to say that I PREFER that lens to the "old" 70-200mm f2.8 VRII - I find the f4 version noticeably sharper on the edges of the higher resolution FX cameras, and it's certainly WAY lighter and smaller. And a whole lot cheaper. At this point it's coming in at almost HALF the price of the new AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8E FL ED VR. I'd recommend anyone considering a new 70-200 to at least try out the f4 version - it sure the heck surprised me (and its size and weight is great for hiking or traveling)

Natural Art Images: Voice: Brad Hill Blog

I don't recall a single situation in the past where Adobe introduced support for the raw file formats for flagship cameras from Nikon or Canon BEFORE the cameras shipped. This is a very positive move - in the past I found few things more frustrating than getting a new camera and waiting for a month or more before the top raw converters began supporting it. I don't know if credit should be given to Adobe (for quick work), Nikon and Canon (for supporting their partner's efforts and getting them the info they needed to accommodate the new file formats), or both. But kudos to whoever is responsible.

The Blog of Brad Hill, wildlife photographer

OK...this might seem like a bit of silly thing to talk about (though not as silly as those ludicrous "unpacking videos" you'll find online!) but it does reflect a "big picture" difference I'm noticing between Nikon and Sigma: one of them seems focused on function and value and the other is...uhhh...a bit more driven by history and tradition (and not too receptive to change). What do I mean? Here's an example: The two lenses come with pretty much the same bits in the box, including carrying case, lens covers, et cetera. And Nikon has spent a bundle on giving you an absolutely beautiful carrying case that looks like high-end luggage. It includes internal "sculpting" to perfectly match the lens. Almost a work of art! Sigma, in contrast, includes a padded cordura case that holds the lens securely but has room for other accessories inside, like a pro body and other bits. And, the Sigma case has backpack style straps on it. In short, the Sigma case is actually quite functional and I can see a lot of owners using it as airline carry-on or even in the field. I'll definitely use that case. I can't speak for everyone else, but I can't imagine using the Nikon case for anything but putting the lens in when I sell it and need to ship it to someone else (which is the ONLY thing I ever did with the similar cases that came with my old and long-gone Nikkor 400mm f2.8G VR and my Nikkor 600mm f4G VR). Nikon case: very nice and classy but pretty useless. Sigma case: not too pretty, but kinda useful and functional.