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We, five Deaf counselors, have come together to write this article to educate our fellow counselors about Deaf culture, the Deaf community and working with Deaf clients.

Deaf Culture: Exploring Deaf Communities in the United States

Mental health of deaf people - ScienceDirect

A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America [John Vickrey Van Cleve, Barry A
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Presents an overview of various aspects of literature common in the U.S. Deaf Community, including those forms written in English and those forms signed in ASL. Applies the recurring themes and metaphors in the context of the history of the U.S. Deaf Community.

Course Descriptions | Reynolds Community College

10/03/1989 · A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America [John Vickrey Van Cleve, Barry A
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LIRID Member Appreciation Day
Domestic Violence in the Deaf Community


Deaf people are more likely to experience domestic or intimate partner violence than their hearing counterparts. This workshop will be an introduction to domestic violence and intimate partner violence. Participants will learn about statistics and warning signs and how this problem affects the Deaf community. Participants will learn what to do, how to respond, and where to get help if they suspect a consumer is experiencing domestic violence. Mandatory reporting will also be discussed.

Saturday, Sept 9, 2017
12:30pm-2:30pm
Lunch will be provided at 11:30am, after the general meeting.

 

California State University, Northridge

01/10/2013 · We, five Deaf counselors, have come together to write this article to educate our fellow counselors about Deaf culture, the Deaf community and …
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Introduces students to the skills which are necessary to achieve their academic goals, to services offered at the college, and to American Sign Language and Interpreter Education. Covers topics such as services at the college; the library; counseling and advising; listening, test taking, and study skills; learning styles; career and personal development; and topical areas which are applicable to American Sign Language and Interpreter Education. Explores the existence of the Deaf people, who as a community share history, literature, customs, and culture.

Find great deals for Deaf Culture: Exploring Deaf Communities in the United States by Raychelle Harris, Irene W
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It is important to note the distinction between changing a word's definition and changing its connotation. Women have sought not to change the definitions of (for example) 'cunt' or 'slut', but instead to alter the cultural connotations of the terms. Thus, the reclaimed word 'cunt' is still defined as 'vagina' and the reclaimed 'slut' still means 'sexual predator'. What have been reclaimed are the social attitudes towards the concepts of vaginas and sexual predators: whereas these once attracted negative connotations, they have been transvalued into positive concepts. In a sense, this is true of a large number of terms which are regarded as positive by some yet as negative by others: for example, 'liberal' is used as an insult by conservatives, and 'conservative' is used as an insult by liberals. Salman Rushdie gives examples of older political terms which have also been reclaimed: "To turn insults into strengths, Whigs [and] Tories [both] chose to wear with pride the names they were given in scorn" (1988). Also, in Thailand, poor farmers protesting against the aristocratic political system wore t-shirts with the word 'prai' ('commoner') as a symbol of pride, in "a brilliant subversion of a word that these days has insulting connotations" (Banyan, 2010). In a similar case, UK politician Andrew Mitchell was accused of calling a police constable a 'pleb', prompting FunkyShirts to produce 'PC PLEB" and 'PC PLEB AND PROUD' t-shirts (2012). After Republicans derided Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as 'Obamacare', Obama himself began using this more concise though originally derogatory term, professing that he liked it.


Resources for working with Deaf-Blind people

Develops vocabulary, conversational competence, and grammatical knowledge with a total immersion approach. Introduces increasingly complex grammatical aspects, including those unique to ASL. Discusses culture and literature. Encourages contact with the Deaf Community to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. Part II of II.

Index to the Web site of The Textbook League

Develops vocabulary, conversational competence, and grammatical knowledge with a total immersion approach. Introduces increasingly complex grammatical aspects, including those unique to ASL. Discusses culture and literature. Encourages contact with the Deaf Community to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. Part I of II.

JSTOR: Viewing Subject: Anthropology

Newspaper headlines often use the phrase 'the c-word' to pun on other contentious terms beginning with that letter: "the phrase 'the c-word' is sometimes deliberately used to mean something else, while exploiting the intertextuality of the original meaning" (Ruth Wajnryb, 2004); for example 's headline (Andrea Hubert, 2013), in which Moretz compared the c-word in America and the UK: "cunt is a funny word. It's a strong word, sure, but more so in America. In England it's just like any other curse word". The most common example of this is 'Christmas', which, like 'cancer', can be seen as an alternative 'c-word'. The 2001 headline , for example, is about the removal of the word 'Christmas' from secular greetings cards. In the article, Richard Littlejohn asks, rhetorically: "Who, exactly, is offended by the C-word?". He has fun inventing phrases such as "Father C-word", "C-word Eve", and "C-word Day", all attempts to highlight the absurdity of banning the word 'Christmas'. Less festively, he also bemoans the culture of liberalism, 'political correctness', and 'istas' (in other words, his usual targets), asking: "How on earth do you describe these New Scrooges? Difficult, I know. But try the other C-word". As if that wasn't enough, Littlejohn went on to essentially repeat himself two Christmases later, in another article also headlined ("the dreaded C Word [...] Christmas", 2003). Catherine Bennett, in an article also headlined (in , 2003), also criticised the censorship of 'Christmas'. Tim Rider's article (2004) was also about the contentiousness of 'Christmas': "They do not want any mention of what they call the C-Word because they are worried it will offend followers of other faiths" (2004), as was the article (in , 2004) which urged readers to say 'Christmas' despite its controversy. Yet another article, headlined (2004) also concerned the festive season: "Ditch the dreams of a white Christmas", as did Jay Nordlinger's article ("people could not bring themselves to utter the C-word", 2003). used the headline on the front page of its 2013 Christmas gift issue (13/11/2013). After TV presenter Andrew Strauss called Kevin Pietersen a 'cunt', punned that he had been called "charming": "Kevin Pietersen was described live on air by Piers Morgan as "charming". Cricket experts were aghast at the "inappropriate use of the c-word"", in a spoof article headlined (2014).