• Political Philosophy of Alasdair MacIntyre
  • The Forbidden Knowledge of Secret Societies
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TLD is a young man in a world of men turned to sheep. He spends much of his time reading, thinking, and waking up minds that are willing to awake.

It is a fundamental mistake to see the enemy as a set of targets

The enemy in war is a group of people

Some of them will have to be killed
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Two very different views of secret societies are revealed in the quotations above. The first describes a spiritual brotherhood pledged to Wisdom and guiding humanity toward the realm of the Infinite; the second seeks to expose the machinations of power-seekers who cloak their manipulative agendas in darkness. In addition to spiritual and political secret societies, one could add criminal secret societies such as the Mafia, or even clandestine elite military units – neither of which will be discussed here.

"The very word secrecy is repugnant, in a free and open society

Modern Culture Mirrors Jezebel’s Poisonous Spirit – …
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Few studies have been performed on the relationships between energy, brains, and sleep, but a recent one found that sleep seems to be .Larger brains had to confer immediate advantages or else they would not have evolved, especially as energy-demanding as they are. Evolutionary pressures ensure that there is no cost without an immediate benefit. As humans have demonstrated, intelligence combined with manipulative ability led to a domination of Earth that no other organism ever achieved. Humans weigh about 50% more than chimpanzees, but have brains three times the size. A human brain comprises about 2% of the body’s mass, but uses nearly 20% of its energy at rest. Growing an energy-demanding organ was funded with the coin of energy. How did protohumans manage it?There are a number of possible solutions to obtaining the energy to fuel the growing protohuman brain, and they all fall under these categories: Studies have shown that humans and chimpanzees have the same basal metabolism, so the first possibility is considered very unlikely in our ancestors, although large brains in general . The subject of reducing energy output has an intriguing hypothesis: bipedal motion allowed humans to move by using less energy than our pre-bipedal ancestors. Human bipedal locomotion requires only a quarter of the energy that chimpanzee locomotion does, and chimps use about a quarter of their metabolism walking, although whether this was a key evolutionary event is controversial. Even though protohumans would have taken advantage of bipedal walking to range farther than chimps (humans can average 11 miles a day, while chimps can only achieve six), thereby using a relatively larger proportion of their energy on locomotion; bipedal locomotion energy savings alone might largely account for the growing brain’s energy needs. was developed to account for the required energy, which proposed that energy to fuel the growing brain came from reducing digestion costs, which was initially provided by eating more meat. and can digest cellulose while humans cannot. The human digestive tract is only about 60% of the size expected for a primate of our size. Human guts are far smaller than chimp and especially gorilla guts, which process all of that low-calorie foliage. Chimp and gorilla rib cages flare outward from top-to-bottom, like a dress, as did australopithecine rib cages, to accommodate large guts, as . When chimpanzees eat meat, they put large, tough leaves in their mouths. That helps them overachieve as meat eaters, as their teeth and jaws are poorly adapted for chewing meat. Mountain gorillas eat no meat at all. In the wild, great apes spend about half of their day chewing. Chimpanzees are the most carnivorous great ape, and although meat is the greatest treasure in chimpanzee societies, they often stop eating meat after chewing it for an hour or two and revert to fruit and other softer foods if they can get it. Chimpanzees when their staple, fruit, is scarce. Chimps have been seen killing monkeys, eating their organs, and then abandoning the carcasses to find more monkeys to kill. Organ meats and intestines are far easier to chew, and a poor meat chewer like a chimpanzee prefers soft meats. Just as chimpanzees prefer soft meats, predators will eat soft organs first and leave the tougher muscle for later, if they eat it at all. It depends on how plentiful the available flesh is, but the pattern across all predator groups is clear: eat the best, first, and leave the lesser quality foods to the end or let scavengers have them. It will always be a cost/benefit decision. All things being equal, the less time and energy needed to eat something, the sooner it will be eaten. If extra time and effort is needed to procure food, then the nutritional reward (primarily in energy) has to be exceptional to justify it. Evolutionary pressures have made animals into excellent accountants. The human sweet tooth is a relic of humanity’s fruit-eating ape heritage, and the desire for fatty foods reflects an adaptation to prefer that energy-richest of foods. Fat (made of hydrocarbons) is the ultimate energy windfall of all foods.

 

Those societies that have begun to successfully develop industrial ..

Journal Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy ..
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The authors noted that this is the first report of the use of spinal manipulation postepidural injection in the cervical spine.(7)The 1 study of manipulation under joint anesthesia/analgesia (MUJA) found in the literature search had only 4 subjects.(8) Michaelsen noted in a paper published in 2000 that MUJA should be viewed with “guarded optimism because its success is based solely on anecdotal experience.”(9)Searches of the literature using the MEDLINE® database did not find any additional published studies on spinal MUA involving serial sessions or on MUA of multiple joints.Clinical Input Received From Physician Specialty Societies and Academic Medical CentersWhile the various physician specialty societies and academic medical centers may collaborate with and make recommendations during this process, through the provision of appropriate reviewers, input received does not represent an endorsement or position statement by the physician specialty societies or academic medical centers, unless otherwise noted.In response to requests, input was received from 2 physician specialty societies and 4 academic medical centers while this policy was under review in 2009.

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In Nineteen Eighty-Four Orwell created a totalitarian universe, Oceania, with its own history and inner mechanism and became so famous that it gave gay to a new term known as which has come to describe actions or organizations reminiscent of the totalitarian society depicted throughout the novel.In this essay, I am going to explain the different examples about ‘manipulation of language as a weapon of mind control and abuse of power’ that we can find in the novel, that is to say, the different methods the author uses to show us this.George Orwell’s writings are focused basically against The situations he live throughout his life made him reject any kind of totalitarian society.