• Free-Will in Oedipus the King
  • In "Oedipus Rex," King Oedipus lives and dies by fate.
  • Oedipus the King is certainly a tragedy, and as Dr.

The author of “Oedipus the King,” Sophocles, writes a tragic fate that Oedipus was born to experience.

The same debate applies to Oedipus the King and Oedipus at Colonus.

(Greek: Oedipus Tyrannus; Latin: Oedipus Rex; Oedipus the King)

In the play, Oedipus the King, that special force is also used and is known and defined as fate.
The story of Oedipus Rex by Sophocles seems to prove truth in both of these statements, that there is a life predetermined for you yet you can alter your life, but you can not escape your prophecy....

Soon Oedipus's smarts saved the town of Thebes, and he was made king.


My children, latest born to Cadmus old,
Why sit ye here as suppliants, in your hands
Branches of olive filleted with wool?
What means this reek of incense everywhere,
And everywhere laments and litanies?
Children, it were not meet that I should learn
From others, and am hither come, myself,
I Oedipus, your world-renowned king.
Ho! aged sire, whose venerable locks
Proclaim thee spokesman of this company,
Explain your mood and purport. Is it dread
Of ill that moves you or a boon ye crave?
My zeal in your behalf ye cannot doubt;
Ruthless indeed were I and obdurate
If such petitioners as you I spurned.

 

Nortwick, Thomas. Oedipus: The Meaning of Fate and Free-Will.


Despite the Greek notions of supreme power of the gods and fate, Oedipus' downfall is primarily the result of King Laius' and his own actions and attempts to defy the gods, consequently Sophocles says that prophecies from the gods of someone's fate should not be ignored....


Free Will In Oedipus the King, one of Sophocles’ most popular plays, Sophocles clearly depicts the Greek’s popular belief that fate will control a man’s life despite of man’s free will.


On this strong basis of fate, free will doesn't even exist.

Aristotle rates ' tragedy, 'Oedipus the King' as the greatest ever composed, and it is this text which gives us the most detailed account of his fall from grace after his aforementioned coronation. sets the scene many years after Oedipus came to Thebes, when he has been married to Jocasta for many years and sired four children, Antigone, Ismene, Polynices and Eteocles. A plague has struck Thebes and a Priest begs Oedipus, the most cunning and intelligent of all men, to find a solution. As it happens, Oedipus has already sent a messenger in the form of his brother-in-law, Creon, to the oracle at Delphi in order to find out how he might appease Apollo and stop the plague. Creon returns with the answer: the city itself is unclean as it harbours the killer of Laius, and he must be found and punished before the city can become cleansed. Oedipus swears to find and execute the murderer and brings down a curse on anyone who harbours him, cursing himself and his family in the process.

It was Oedipus’s fate that the shepherd didn't kill him.

Yea, Oedipus, my sovereign lord and king,
Thou seest how both extremes of age besiege
Thy palace altars—fledglings hardly winged,
and greybeards bowed with years; priests, as am I
of Zeus, and these the flower of our youth.
Meanwhile, the common folk, with wreathed boughs
Crowd our two market-places, or before
Both shrines of Pallas congregate, or where
Ismenus gives his oracles by fire.
For, as thou seest thyself, our ship of State,
Sore buffeted, can no more lift her head,
Foundered beneath a weltering surge of blood.
A blight is on our harvest in the ear,
A blight upon the grazing flocks and herds,
A blight on wives in travail; and withal
Armed with his blazing torch the God of Plague
Hath swooped upon our city emptying
The house of Cadmus, and the murky realm
Of Pluto is full fed with groans and tears.
Therefore, O King, here at thy hearth we sit,
I and these children; not as deeming thee
A new divinity, but the first of men;
First in the common accidents of life,
And first in visitations of the Gods.
Art thou not he who coming to the town
of Cadmus freed us from the tax we paid
To the fell songstress? Nor hadst thou received
Prompting from us or been by others schooled;
No, by a god inspired (so all men deem,
And testify) didst thou renew our life.
And now, O Oedipus, our peerless king,
All we thy votaries beseech thee, find
Some succor, whether by a voice from heaven
Whispered, or haply known by human wit.
Tried counselors, methinks, are aptest found [1]
To furnish for the future pregnant rede.
Upraise, O chief of men, upraise our State!
Look to thy laurels! for thy zeal of yore
Our country's savior thou art justly hailed:
O never may we thus record thy reign:—
"He raised us up only to cast us down."
Uplift us, build our city on a rock.
Thy happy star ascendant brought us luck,
O let it not decline! If thou wouldst rule
This land, as now thou reignest, better sure
To rule a peopled than a desert realm.
Nor battlements nor galleys aught avail,
If men to man and guards to guard them tail.

We’ve been reading Oedipus the King written by Sophocles.



When Oedipus defeated the Sphinx by solving the riddle, he could have refused to take the missing king's throne. He could have also declined to marry the former king's wife, unaware that the queen was his own mother. He accepted both of these without any regrets. If his decision was different it might have altered the course of events in the future. His personality made sure that the decisions went the way they did. These choices were made by Oedipus with his own free will, his own decisions. He didn't have to accept these gifts, but did none the less. These conclusions would lead to his own demise, but they were his own mistakes, not fate.